Story of Self, P. 1: Sharing Your Story | National Democratic Training Committee

Story of Self, P. 1: Sharing Your Story

By Ibie Hart
60 min
Management & Leadership

What You’ll Learn

  • The power of telling stories and when it can be a useful tool
  • How to identify the four elements of telling your Story of Self in a political setting
  • How to develop and practice telling your Story of Self

Why This is Important

You have limited time and money — but you can bring more people into your campaign and have a wider group to spread the work around. The story of your journey to political work is powerful and can inspire others to join your campaign. Learn to tell that story concisely and effectively so it resonates with your audience, builds your relationship with them, and moves them to vote or volunteer!

Key Resources

  • Story of Self Worksheet
  • Story of Self Feedback Guide

Related Trainings

  • Creating a Positive Team Culture — Sharing your story with your teammates can build trust and support the culture you’re trying to build.
  • Story of Self, P. 2: Tailoring Your Story (coming soon) — Adapting your story to the specific audience you’ll be sharing it with is a key component to sharing your story effectively

Acknowledgement

This training is based on the work of Marshall Ganz at Harvard University. We are very grateful for his leadership in this space.

Ibie Hart

Trainer

Ibie runs her own political consulting firm, Hart 4 Change, and serves as the Chief of Staff for Senator Robert Peters of the 13th State Senate District in Illinois. She is a Civitas Child Law Fellow J.D. and M.P.P. Graduate from Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

In her first year of law school, she became an education reform advocate and founded Stand Up For Each Other, Chicago! (SUFEO). SUFEO is an organization she created to address the school-to-prison pipeline and support student rights in the school discipline process. After law school, she worked for Common Cause as their state Outreach and Engagement Manager. In that role, she empowered ordinary people to engage with their government in meaningful ways such as canvassing, phone banking, registering voters, poll watching and more.

When she's not working, Ibie is painting a canvas, leading a church group, and dancing whenever music is near.