March 18, 2020

By Kelly Dietrich

If you’re running for office right now, you’re facing some tough challenges. No one is knocking doors, let alone showing up for volunteer shifts – and rightly so.

But you still need to connect with voters.

How? It’s time to step up your texting game.

Yes, texting.

Most candidates have to fully accept and adopt texting into their campaign plans, but the new Coronavirus reality will soon change this. 

Texting is one of the easiest and cheapest ways to connect with voters one-on-one at scale. 

This isn’t about spamming people with unwanted messages. This is a new way to have conversations with voters about issues they care about and how you can help them.

The fundamental idea is to have real humans behind the texts to answer questions and concerns people may have. Just like in call time, don’t just talk at the other person. Have a conversation. Ask questions. 

On small campaigns, this may just be you behind a computer texting people one at a time. But, if you can scale, you can get volunteers to help from their homes. Eventually, you may want to get a consultant to help. 

This is a lot to consider, so we put together a course for you. It’s free and available to any Democrats across the country – just like all of NDTC’s trainings. And, you can take it anytime.

You can take NDTC’s course on texting HERE.

As always, let us know what you think. Ask us questions at [email protected] or join our Facebook Group to learn from others.

Kelly is the Founder and CEO of the National Democratic Training Committee.

He has worked on dozens of campaigns at every level across the country. Kelly's specialty is in new campaign creation, candidate and staff training, and fundraising.

In addition to working for 18+ years in Democratic politics, he teaches a class on political campaigns at DePaul University in Chicago, where he lives with his family and dog, a large hungry blue Weimaraner named Jack Bauer. Kelly started his career in 1998 with Rep. Dennis Moore in KS-03. He's an avid basketball and poker player, though never at the same time. His wife would point out that at no time in this biography was he described as "good" at either hobby. That was a conscious decision.