30-Day Challenge: 3 Things Candidates Can Learn | NDTC

From Joe Biden’s presidential victory to Democrats’ down-ballot success, the 2020 election left us inspired and hopeful.

Here at NDTC, it’s exciting to see over 1,300 of our trainees run for office. We could not be more proud.

Democrats flipped seats in traditionally Republican areas. Blue candidates also ran competitive campaigns in districts that haven’t seen a Democrat in decades. 

Now, it’s your turn to bring change to your community.

NDTC hosts the 30-Day Challenge every January to prepare thousands of candidates to run for office. This series of emails familiarizes you with the realities of running for office. By the end of the 30 days, you’ll be ready to launch an effective campaign. 

Here are three things you’ll learn when completing the 30-Day Challenge. 

Improve Your Social Media

If your campaign is not visible on social media, it will not be successful. A critical part of  an engaging social media strategy is figuring out how, where, and when to send your message.

In the 30-Day Challenge, we’ll walk you through best practices for each platform. 

NDTC coaching will help secure your personal accounts and increase Facebook and Twitter engagement on campaign posts. You’ll understand how to transform digital conversations into real relationships. 

These digital media skills will put you on a path to victory.

Create Local Connections

When running for office, you need to know your community leaders.

You need buy-in from these powerful people to be successful in your bid.

This may include elected officials, local party leaders, union members, or activists who are the community voice. 

Building relationships with key individuals provides access to resources including: money, volunteers, and other powerful connections . The opportunity to build your network will help you earn loyalty with affinity groups in your area. 

You can’t rely on your personal circle to win a campaign. You must broaden your reach, so these connections are essential.  

In the 30-Day Challenge, we’ll give action steps for identifying and connecting with the leaders in your community.

Make an Elevator Pitch

Imagine you step into an elevator with a voter. They recognize you from the news and ask, “Why should I vote for you?”

What are you going to say?

You only have the length of time of an elevator ride to explain why anyone should vote for you. This short summary is an elevator pitch. 

This brief explanation of who you are and why you’re running gives folks enough information to influence their decision. 

You might think a 15-second elevator ride isn’t enough time. The point is your answer shouldn’t be long, as you only have a voter’s attention for seconds. 

In the 30-Day Challenge, we’ll walk you through how to perfect this pitch and win voters quickly and effectively.

It’s Your Turn

2018 and 2020 galvanized progressive energy and ushered in new Democrats. We expect 2021 and beyond to be even better. 

This is your chance to make a change in your community. When you commit to running for office, NDTC commits to support you every step of the way.

This is your time.

TAKE THE 30-DAY CHALLENGE

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January 25, 2021

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Jacob Vurpillat

Jacob is the Manager of Political Communications for NDTC. Jacob was initially an intern for NDTC in 2016 before moving on to work for both a Chicago Alderman and an Illinois State Representative. After working in Parliament in the Republic of Ireland, Jacob joined NDTC in April of 2018. Jacob is a graduate of DePaul University with a degree in Political Science. Outside of politics, Jacob tries to forget the Chicago Cub's century of losing while enjoying their recent success.